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Anthropology: Citing & Referencing

For your citing and referencing in Anthropology, you should use Monash University Library's guide to Harvard Style referencing: 

​Harvard Style at the Citing and Referencing Guide

 


Referencing Exhibition and Museum Material for Anthropology

Struggling with your museum references? Don't worry!


    Citing and referencing


Each reference has two parts: the in-text citation you use in your writing, and the full reference in your Bibliography at the end of the assignment or paper.

You may write about material you find in an Exhibition using an in-text citation like this:

...Referring to her sense of identity as a long-term migrant in Australia, Visopiano Zokimi Sanyü, a young Naga woman, said, “I feel like I don't fit in when I return home to my father's people or in Australia: I feel like I am in-between” (Immigration Museum 2011).

And then you also need to list the full reference in the Bibliography:

Immigration Museum (2011) Identity: yours, mine, ours Exhibition, Melbourne, Visited on 1 April 2015

If you individually discuss multiple items from the same exhibition, they will need to be referenced individually. If multiple items from the same exhibition have the same date, you will need to include a letter of the alphabet to distinguish them, starting with a, b, c:

Immigration Museum (2011a) Identity: yours, mine, ours Exhibition, People Like Me-Searching for Clues Section, Visopiano Zokimi Sanyü. Melbourne, Visited on 1 April 2015

Immigration Museum (2011b)….

Immigration Museum (2011c)…

(NOTE: Do not colour the letters in your references. The bolding is used here for demonstration only.)


     Some referencing examples


Audio-visual source within an exhibition:

Immigration Museum of Victoria (2011a) Identity: yours, mine, ours Exhibition, People Like Me Section, Audio-visual material from Ede Horton, Melbourne, Visited on 1 April 2015.

A didactic or information panel in an exhibition:

Immigration Museum of Victoria (2011b) Identity: yours, mine, ours Exhibition, Didactic panel accompanying artefact "Football Jumper". Melbourne, Visited on 1 August 2009.

From a website:

Immigration Museum of Victoria Website (2011c) Identity: yours, mine, ours Exhibition, Passports Please Section, Viewed 21 March 2016, http://museumvictoria.com.au/immigrationmuseum/discoverycentre/identity/people-like-me/passports-please/


     Writing about and referencing personal anecdotes/information


You need to provide enough details for the reader to know where information comes from.

If you are talking about your family story you can just tell it with no need to reference:

"My family immigrated to Australia from Uruguay in 1972. We came by... It was difficult to..."

If you want to introduce conversations, emails or letters you can cite them this way:

"When we arrived in Australia we were like chickens with our heads cut off," explained my Aunty Ela in a letter to my mother, Dora Biggins (2011, pers. comm. 3 July).

OR

If you have more details can footnote it this way:

  1. Personal conversation with Sandra Truong at Robert’s annual Christmas party 23 December 2013.
  2. This information was given to me by my Aunty Ela in personal correspondence [letter/email/phonecall/sms/etc] dated 23 March 2015.

    Personal communications are not usually included in a reference list or bibliography, so you do not need to reference them, only cite them