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Research impact and publishing: Author Impact

Indicators of author impact

  • total number of publications
  • total number of career citations
  • % of documents cited
  • average number of citations
  • h-index
  • documents in the top 1%
  • who is citing you?
  • how quickly are you being cited?

Highly cited researchers

Clarivate Analytics provides a list of Highly Cited Researchers who in the last 10-years have authored or co-authored the highest number of highly cited papers (papers placing in the top 1%) for their publications.  

Essential Science Indicators is a database that identifies Top, Highly Cited (top 1%) and Hot papers within the Web of Science, and includes field citation rate baselines to allow for benchmarking.

InCites provides the metric % of Documents Cited using Web of Science data to show the percentage of your documents that have been cited at least once.

Indicators of recognition / esteem

ERA includes the following measures of esteem that constitute recognition of high regard by experts within a field of research:

  • Editor of a prestigious work of reference
  • Fellowship of a learned academy and membership of AIATSIS
  • Recipient of a nationally competitive research fellowship
  • Membership of a statutory committee
  • Australia Council grant or fellowship

Other measures of esteem may include:

  • Peer review record
  • Invitations to speak, particularly as the keynote
  • Involvement in committees, organisations or societies
  • International research collaborations
  • Key industry partnerships
  • PhD supervisions
  • Grants or funding received
  • Awards or rankings in prestigious lists
  • Contribution to policy debate or legislation change
  • Contribution to professional guidelines or standards
  • Curriculum developments or teaching excellence

Your impact track record

To obtain a profile of your publication metrics (h-index, citations by year, total
citations etc.) search the following databases to see which one best represents
your research outputs:

Additional tools for benchmarking yourself against peers and evaluating
institutional productivity worldwide:

What is the h-index (and its variants)?

The h-index is a popular metric in the sciences that attempts to qualify the impact and the quantity of a researcher's publication output

The h-index tends to favour those in a later stage of career or those in fields that actively cite and publish. It can only increase over time and is not a measure of current productivity.

The h-index is equal to the number of publications (h) which have been cited at least h times.

Example: Working our way down the table below we can see this researcher has 5 publications cited at least 5 times. Therefore they have a h-index of 5.

See: Hirsch, J. (2005) "An index to quantify an individual's scientific research output" PNAS 102 (46), 16569–16572.

The g-index quantifies scientific productivity based on your publication record. If you have some highly cited papers you might consider using the g-index, as it allows for higher-cited papers to 'make up' for the lower cited ones.  The g-index is always at least the h-index, and usually higher.  

To find the g-index, rank articles from highest to lowest citations, then find the largest number (the top g articles received together at least g2 citations).

Tip:
If you do use anything other than h-index, it is a good idea to provide information about how it is calculated. 

The m-index may help in the comparison of early-career and established researchers.

The m-index equals the h-index divided by the number of years of activity. 

If your m-index rates comparatively to the m-index of research leaders in your field, you could highlight this. Note that the m-index inherently assumes unbroken research activity since the first publication.

Tip:
If you do use anything other than h-index, it is a good idea to provide information about how it is calculated. 

The i10 index was created by Google Scholar. If you have created a free Google Scholar profile, you can find your i10 index in the My Citations feature of your profile.
 
i10-Index is the number of articles cited (by others) at least 10 times.
 
Tip:
If you do use anything other than h-index, it is a good idea to provide information about how it is calculated. 
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Calculating your h-index and citation rate

Use  Web of Science, Scopus or Google Scholar  to calculate your h-index and citation rates for your publications.

Note: Your h-index may be different in each database due to differences in content coverage and frequency of updates.

Web of Science
  1. Login via the Library
  2. Use Author search to locate your publication list
  3. Click Create Citation Report

Note: On your Citation report page, restrict the report to a specific time period using the drop down boxes at the top of your publication list. Citation data is available since 1980.

Scopus
  1. Login via the Library
  2. Use Author search to locate your publication list
  3. Click View citation overview

Note 1: On your Citation overview page, restrict the overview to a specific time period using the drop down boxes at the top of the page.
Note 2: Citation data in Scopus is available from 1996 to present. For
publications prior to 1996 the citation information may not be accurate.

Google Scholar
  1. Go to Google Scholar
  2. Locate your Google Scholar profile (or set up a profile)

 

reading The journal coverage of Web of Science and Scopus: a comparative analysis

reading Google Scholar, Scopus and the Web of Science: a longitudinal and cross-disciplinary comparison

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