Skip to content

Citing and referencing: Journals

A guide to the styles recommended by Monash schools and departments for students and researchers

IEEE Introductory Contents

Mechanics and structure of IEEE style:

IEEE style contents: Examples

Publication examples:

IEEE Resources

Journals

 

Check that you are using the standard abbreviations for journals and magazines

Journals page contents:

Journals
Journal articles (print)

Online Journal articles - when the DOI is available

Online Journal articles - with a URL and no DOI

Magazines
Magazine articles (print)
Online magazine article with a DOI
Online magazine article with a URL and no DOI

 

 

Journal articles (print)

Citation Elements

Author(s) First name or initials. Surname, “Name of paper,” Abbrev. Title of Periodical (in italics), vol. x, no. x, pp. xxx–xxx, Abbrev. Month, year.

When referencing IEEE Transactions, "if the issue number or month is not avaialble, research IEEEXplore to update the information" p. 34 of IEEE Editorial Style Manual.

Examples

Journal article with no month details

 
[1] K. P. Dabke and K. M. Thomas, "Expert system guidance for library users," Library Hi Tech, vol. 10, no. 1-2, pp. 53-60, 1992.
Journal article with journal title abbreviated and month details provided
[2] H. Yang, H. Luo, F. Ye, S. Lu and L. Zhang, “Security in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks: Challenges and Solutions,” IEEE Wireless Comm., vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 38–47, Feb. 2004.

Note: The journal title IEEE Wireless Communications has been abbreviated as per IEEE convention.

IEEE transactions journal title citation
[3] H.Fujihara, M. Goto, T.Kitahara and H.G.Okuno, "A Modeling of Singing Voice Robust to Accompaniment Sounds and Its Application to Singer Identification and Vocal-Timbre-Similarity-Based Music Information Retrieval," IEEE Audio, Speech, Language Process., vol.18, no. 3, pp.638–648, Mar. 2010.
Journal article which is yet to be published
[4] A.A. Aziz, Y.A. Sekercioglu, P. Fitzpatrick and M. Ivanovich "A survey on distributed topology control techniques for extending the lifetime of battery powered wireless sensor networks," IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, to be published.

Yet to be published: (ie. accepted or scheduled) with as many details as are available with the phrase "to be published" added in the reference.

[top]

Online Journal articles - when the DOI is available

This is the preferred method for referencing an online journal article, but you can only use this method if you have a DOI. This is the simpliest method for the researcher and potential readers of the research output.  Fortunately, many databases have a Digital Object Identifier which is commonly abbreviated to DOI in our subscribed databases such as IEEExplore. "The basic guideline for citing online sources is to follow the standard citation for the source given previously and add the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) at the end of the citation, or add the DOI in place of page numbers if the source is not paginated."  See p.3 IEEE Citation Reference.

Citation Elements

Author(s) First name or initials. Surname, “Name of paper,” Abbrev. Title of Periodical (in italics), vol. x, no. x, pp. xxx–xxx, Abbrev. Month, year.

Examples

IEEE Transactions journal title

 
[5] X. Li, J. Vucic, V. Jungnickel, and J. Armstrong, "On the capacity of intensity-modulated direct-detection syst. and the inform. rate of ACO-OFDM for indoor optical wireless applications," IEEE Trans. Commun., vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 799-809, Mar. 2012. doi:10.1109/TCOMM.2012.020612.090300
Standard journal article
[6] X. Zhu and X. Wu, “Class noise vs. attribute noise: A quantitative study of their impacts,” Artif. Intell. Rev., vol. 22, no. 3/4, pp. 177–210, Nov. 2004. doi: 10.1007/s10462-004-0751-8

Note: The title Artificial Intelligence Review has been abbreviated.

[top]

Online Journal articles - with a URL and no DOI

You can use this method if you are citing an online journal article with a URL and there is no DOI available.

Citation Elements

Author(s) First name or initials. Surname. (year, month). Title of article. Title of Journal (in italics). [Type of medium]. volume number in italics (issue number in italics), pp. pages. Available: site/path/file

Example

Journal article with URL from author's homepage

 

This version of the same article as above with a DOI, is housed on the author's university homepage with a URL.  You will notice the style is quite different.  This example has the journal title Artificial Intelligence Review abbreviated.

[7] X. Zhu and X. Wu. (2004, Nov.) Class noise vs. attribute noise: A quantitative study of their impacts. Artif. Intell. Rev. [Online]. vol. 22 (no. 3/4), pp. 177–210. Available: http://cs.nju.edu.cn/zhouzh/zhouzh.files/course/dm/reading/reading03/zhu_airev04.pdf

[top]

Magazine articles (print)

Citation Elements

Author(s) First name or initials. Surname, “Name of paper,” Abbrev. Title of Magazine (in italics), vol. x, no. x, pp. xxx–xxx, Abbrev. Month, year.

 

Examples
[8] C. Null, "The future of your PC,"Australian PC World, pp. 43–52, Dec. 2006.

Note: The country is not needed in the place of publication, if the City is well known, for example: Paris, New York, or Rome.

[top]

Online magazine article with a DOI

The IEEE Editorial Style Manual has one style for all print periodicals (including journal articles and magazine articles). If there is a DOI for the online magazine article, add the DOI number at the end of the citation.

Citation Elements Author(s) First name or initials. Surname, “Name of paper,” Abbrev. Title of Periodical (in italics), vol. x, no. x, pp. xxx–xxx, Abbrev. Month, year.
Examples
[9] Z, Xiao, Y. Xiao and D. H. C. Du, "Non-repudiation in neighborhood area networks for smart grid," IEEE Commun. Mag., vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 18-26 ,Jan. 2013. doi:10.1109/MCOM.2013.6400434

 

[top]

Online magazine article with a URL and no DOI

For an online magazine article which has a URL but does not include a DOI, this following example applies.  (See p. 39 of IEEE Editorial Style Manual).

Citation Elements

Author(s) First name or initials. Surname. (year, month day). Title of article with no quotes. Title of Magazine (in italics) [Type of medium]. pp. pages numbers if given. Available: site/path/file

Note: only item [10] has day included in date details.  You can only include information which is supplied.

Examples

Online magazine accessed from the World Wide Web

 

Note: there are no page numbers provided on this online version of the magazine article.

[10]

J. Farrell. (2007, May 23). In Wikipedia we trust? Cosmos Online [Online]. Available: http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/node/1339

Online magazine article access from a library database
[11] C. Null. (2006, Dec.). The future of your PC. Australian PC World, [Online]. pp. 43–52. Available: http://find.galegroup.com

Note: the article was accessed from Library database: "Expanded Academic".  The URL was shortened from:

<http://find.galegroup.com.ezproxy.lib.monash.edu.au/gtx/infomark.do&source=gale&srcprod=
EAIM&prodId=EAIM&userGroupName=monash&tabID=T003&docId=A153763512&type=retrieve&
contentSet=IAC-Documents&version=1.0>

to the main part of the URL which represents the database provider <http://find.galegroup.com> 

In most instances the URL to periodicals accessed on subscribed databases won't be helpful to potential readers unless they are part of the Monash University community.  However the DOI or other permanent link will be useful where made available.

Online magazine available from the world-wide-web where the title is abbreviated
[12] K. Derkley. (2012, Oct.). Brain implant to be the eye of the beholder. Monash Mag. [Online]. Available: http://www.monash.edu/monashmag/articles/brain-implant-to-be-the-eye-of-the-beholder.html

Note:this example has the word "magazine" from the magazine title abbreviated to "mag." as it is one of the Standard IEEE words.  See Standard abbreviations used in the IEEE reference list.

See Fig. 1. which shows the URL and other identifying information.Example of an online magazine showing URL

Fig 1. Online magazine article with URL

[top]